Why Brand Inconsistency Is Really a Fiscal Issue

Every marketer worth their salt will wax on and on about “brand consistency this, brand consistency that.” And while the arguments about brand reputation, equity and one-voice are really important, that alone isn’t the thing that should make you lose it.

Brand inconsistency screams one thing, really loudly…. Wasted budgets!

Just think it through. If we do something really well once, and then scale it across an enterprise umpteen times, we amortize the initial investment on an almost parabolic scale. Not only are we building and reinforcing a well-thought-out concept on every front, we are also recycling the initial spend.

When you look at your enterprise and see inconsistency, what you really should be seeing are dollars bleeding out of the organization. Every single time a new message, visual, promise or operation is developed that is NOT repurposed from the initial platform, you are buying it again. And again. And again.

Brand inconsistency should not be some esoteric emotional trigger reserved for the marketing department. It should be a hot button for accounting. Enough so that operationalizing Brand should be a top priority for procurement and legal as much as it is for marketing.

It’s all well and good to adjust the brand to a line-of-business. But for Pete’s sake make sure you are leveraging as much material as is humanly possible. Keep your money!

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Eric Berrios is responsible for client strategy and client relationship at Realm in Atlanta, GA. Since 2005, he has been driving business-to-business clients towards setting and achieving their goals and gaining a stronger sense of brand purpose.

You can learn more about Realm on TwitterFacebook.

He has also served on the board of directors for IABC/Atlanta since 2010 as VP Professional Recognition and 2 years as chapter president. This non-profit organization seeks to build business through communication.

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